Tying Flat Knots

So, I’m going to demonstrate this with 5/8″ grosgrain ribbon and my bottle of Crystal Effects. I often use a bottle (or a Stampin’ Around wheel) to tie my ribbon around. I usually do this if I’m going to hide the ends of ribbon between two layers of cardstock/paper. (BTW, if you use Crystal Effects, it’s good to tie around a 4″ panel; if you use your Stampin’ Around wheel, it’s good for a 5-1/4″ panel.) I find that it’s easier to use something solid to tie around (paper *gives* a little and doesn’t have enough mass to stay put all the time). Plus, by tucking end of ribbon between layers, I use less ribbon (yay!) and you don’t see the ribbon on the inside of your card (my husband HATES this).

Anyway, onto the tutorial. I’m a right-y, so I don’t know if that will make a difference.

I start with the ribbon still on the roll (you don’t have to guess how much ribbon you need). I put the loose end on the right, going around the back. The roll is to your left. Cross the loose end OVER the left side.

Step 1

Cross over from top

Then, tuck the loose end under the left side (that’s still on the roll). Make sure to keep the ribbon flat.

Tuck under

Tuck under

Now, do a half-twist of the end still on the roll. This will keep the half-knot for the first stage relatively flat.

Half-twist of bottom end

Half-twist of bottom end

And tighten. Congratulations, we’re halfway through! It’s nice to have a somewhat stiff ribbon, because it will keep its shape once you tighten (don’t you hate to keep pressure to keep it tight?)

Tighten

Tighten

Here’s what each side should look like if they were separate. The idea is to keep everything flat, remember?

Halfway, deconstructed

Halfway, deconstructed

Now for the harder part. Again, take the loose end (which is now at the top). Cross OVER the other end.

Cross loose end over

Cross loose end over

Then, tuck the loose end into the loop you just made. Keep the ribbon flat by folding under.

Fold under and through

Fold under and through

Now, holding the loose end and the flat, loose knot, pull on the end that is still attached to the roll. Keep pulling until you start to see the lumpy parts start to slip INTO the flat knot.

Half-twist

Tighten knot slowly

At this point, you will want to make a half-twist of the loose end (top edge toward you), while slightly pulling on the other end. This will encourage the lumpy parts to slip into/behind the flat part.

Half-twist

Half-twist

Now, you should be able to tighten from both ends and the knot will stay flat. I have about a 90% success rate with this method. I’ve tried the 1/4″ grosgrain, 5/8″ grosgrain, 1-1/4″ striped grosgrain, taffeta, and last year’s double stitched grosgrain and poly twill with equal success. Sometimes, it will still bunch up; just undo up to the halfway point, shift the knot slightly, and try the last stage again.

Here’s the finished knot.

Finished knot

Finished knot

Hope this helps you create successful knots, also!

————-

The above is a copy of the original post. Now, for updates. I forgot to show you the back side of the knot:

Back of knot

Back of knot

As you can see, the “ugly” part of the knot is on the back, and the flat (“pretty”) part is on the front.

You’re also wondering why it was necessary to do a half twist of one side at the end. Well, I thought if I used the double-sided satin ribbon, you can see the rationale.

Double sided ribbon knot

Double sided ribbon knot

As you can see, the half twist made the same color of the ribbon visible on both sides; otherwise, one side would be vanilla and the other kiwi kiss.

It’s kind of cool; I bought a box of chocolates from Godiva (well, more than one anyway, hey they’re for gifts, really!). Their knot looks pretty much like how I figured out how to do them:

Godiva knot

Godiva knot

I’ll update this page if I discover something new. 🙂

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2 Comments

  1. Allison

    I have been looking everywhere for a tutorial for this knot! Thank you! Love it!

  2. Sahil Talwar

    Thank you, helped a lot! 🙂

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